The Value of the Unfamiliar in Property

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The Value of the Unfamiliar in Property

Happy New Year! Covid-19 is providing the property sector with an opportunity to be curious, learn and improve its offerings, for those decision makers with an eye on a future-proof strategy.

Opportunity in the Unfamiliar in Property

Happy New Year! It’s an unfamiliar start to a new year. Uncertainty and disappointment in the holidays don’t make for restorative tonic. However, unfamiliar is good. It’s where we need to be. Unfamiliar is that space beyond our comfort zones, where adaptation and growth happens.

I love January for the space it gives to set out our intentions for the year. For AccessiblePRS, and our property clients, this looks like embracing and adapting to healthy change and dependable longer term property strategies. 

Thank you Covid-19 for making the obvious truths no longer avoidable: our homes do not provide enough of what we need. These endemic failures by government and big housebuilders carry external financial costs at a time when we can ill afford such profligacy - costs to individuals, business, government and the NHS, through mental ill health, lack of independence, stifled productivity, unnecessary energy wastage, avoidable welfare and undesirable social behaviours. 

Unfamiliar is that space beyond our comfort zones, where adaptation and growth happens.

The private sector does not need to wait for permission to act, while policy decision makers work out whether to actually implement much needed changes to planning regulations. Those who include people-centric and ecological design at the core of their property strategy will be the profit generators of the post covid world - whilst creating homes worthy of accolade. 

Change can creep up on us slowly, but as it arrives it’s speed can be staggering. Those organisations which choose not to adapt could find themselves left behind. The pervasive business myth that designing for people and profits are mutually exclusive could be an expensive mistake: the wrong type of property can be an expensive and illiquid liability.

When I’m searching for a holiday let, I am mostly asked to decide whether I am a wheelchair user or a father. I’m both.

And change is coming. Though I beat the drum for inclusive design, I also stand for sustainable, future-proofed, people and community centric designs. As Barry Commoner stated, “everything is connected to everything else.” Yet in the housing sector, we tend to silo our “solutions.” It’s an annoying reality. For example, when I’m searching for a holiday let, I am mostly asked to decide whether I am a wheelchair user or a father. I’m both. When advising clients, we look at whole market factors. It’s one of our value adds. 

As 2021 becomes synonymous with change, see the opportunity that this presents. Position yourself ahead of the curve as an inclusive investor, landlord, architect, developer, or community housing group. Be curious: learn how people, unfamiliar to you, live and use space and see how you can add another significant layer to your already successful business.